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Frans de Waard * Zeno van den Broek * Kassel Jaeger * Orphax Reframed

Orphax Reframed

Frans de Waard’s “Hot August Night” is the answer to anyone that thinks that ambient music ‘needs more cowbell’.
Also three releases on Moving Furniture records that explore the deepest of drones: Zeno van den Broek, Kassel Jaeger and Orphax (remixes).

Bas van Huizen, Orphax, Chihei Hatakeyama, Dirk Serries

Kluwekracht

Perfect Winter Music……
With a small warning:
You máy need the soothing sounds from Chihei Hatakeyama, Dirk Serries and Orphax to recover from the surrealistic nightmares induced by Bas van Huizen’s ‘Kluwekracht’!

D.Rhöne; Sima Kim; Tobias Hellkvist; Joao Damas; Orphax

Exode

D.RHÖNE – III (EXODE)
While creating music as Monolyth & Cobalt, Mathias van Eecloo saved some of his more abstract sounds with the filename D.Rhöne: “…a project to be close to the minimalist and repetitive music, the most closely to a drone state..
In 2012 and 2013 he self-released the first two albums under that same name, and now the third (and last) chapter is available as a free download. (There is also a very limited cd-release but that will probably be sold out by the time you’re reading this).

Steve Roach + Kelly David; Orphax; Russell Harmon + Gavin Miller, Porya Hatami, Mathieu Lamontagne + Emmanuel Toledo

Undone

STEVE ROACH + KELLY DAVID – THE LONG NIGHT
With his impressive back-catalogue spanning over 30 years, Steve Roach may very well be counted as one of the Grandfathers of classic ambient music.
He has always remained true to his personal style: his deep soundscapes has become an example for many other artists.

Digitalsimplyworld; Ashes of Piemonte; Sam Genovese; Orphax; Eren Silence

Ambientblog

In the Shortlist sections, I will mention the albums that I enjoyed listening to, but couldn’t find the time (or the right words) for a “full” review for.
Still, I definitely think they deserve your attention, with or without extra words!

Digitalsimplyworld

DIGITALSIMPLYWORLD – TOUT DEVIENT LA MUSIQUE
[FREE Download]
“Tout Devient La Musique” (“Everything is Music”) offers 81 minutes of highly varied soundscapes “reaching to the ends of classical electronic music, where everything becomes different.”.

Joe Evans, Orphax, Akumu, Alex Durlak, Swartz et

Ambientblog

In the Shortlist sections, I will mention some of the albums that I enjoyed listening to, but couldn’t find the time (or the right words) for a “full” review for. Still, I think they deserve your attention: use the links to find more info and hear previews.

http://www.runningonair.com/JE_EP.html

Joe Evans – Ecliptic Plane
The liner notes to the tracks are almost scientifical, combining details from mathematics, astronomy, musical theory and sound design. Interesting information for those who want to know about this music’s background, but maybe somewhat overwhelming for the casual listener.
But then: this is not intended as ‘casual’ music!
“While this work deals with some of this familiar subject (space, and more specifically, the sun and planets), it does so with the emphasis on time and particularly by how it is marked by movement within the solar system.
The tracks “Ecliptic Plane” and “Resonant TNOs” extensively use the data from the planets, their moons and other objects to create their rhythms and harmonies. In the case of “Resonant TNOs” the musical scale was derived directly from the frequency ratios of the orbits of the titular objects themselves.
Whilst “Approaching/Receding Sun” and “Oort Cloud” are essentially impressionistic in nature, they are the results of mathematical experiments that have links with their subjects through mood and metaphor.
The result is a fascinating showcase of contemporary electronic music, some of which (especially the opening and closing track “Receding/Approaching Sun” ) would have perfectly fitted the “2001 – A Space Odyssey” soundtrack.


Confused

Orphax – Confused
This 30 minute EP took me some time to get used to, because I could not really decide what to think about the loud and rather intrusive opening drone: the sound of the first five-six minutes somehow reminded me of a sustained vuvuzela or bagpipe drone.
So yes, it got me confused indeed. As intended, obviously. 
In these first minutes, Amsterdam-based musician Sietse van Erve defines his aural territory, but once the sound  has pulled you in the track starts evolving slowly, getting deeper and more fascinating with every introduction of a new layer of sound, created improvising with “guitar, electric toothbrush, razor, vocals and audiomulch”.