Eilean & Dauw Dialog Tapes

In recent years it is not uncommon that artists work together without meeting each other in real life. On-Line collaboration is a common working method: sending work-in-progress to each other until it’s ready.
But as far as I know, two labels collaborating together in this way – matching their artists to work in duos on a collaboration track – has not been done before.

Dialog Tapes, released by Eilean Records and Dauw proves that the sum can indeed be much greater than the sum of its parts.

Frans Friederich – Ambient 1998 – 2013

Frans Friederich is a dutch trumpet-player, musician, composer and music teacher living in Zierikzee, Holland.

Friederich’s Bandcamp page displays an extensive overview of his work, all compiled by their different styles and downloadable for free (!).
All these compilations present a large array of adventurous experiments, but there are two specific release that justify recommendation here on Ambientblog: “Ambient 2002 – 2013” and “Ambient 2 – 1998 – 2013” , respectively (- you probably guessed thát).

Anne Chris Bakker – Reminiscenses

A few months ago I wrote some words about Anne Chris Bakker‘s beautiful album Tussenlicht“, a self released limited edition CD-R. (If you haven’t checked this one yet: the digital edition is still available!)

It’s a pleasant surprise to find that his new (first “official”) album Reminiscenses is now released on Dronarivm, the (Moscow-based) contemporary ambient and modern classical music label curated by Pleq and Dimitry Taldykin.

Kleefstra-Pruiksma-Kleefsta – Deislieper

Deislieperis the third release in what I like to call the Kleefstra Wire Trilogy“.
In fact, there’s no real ‘trilogy’, but three separate albums that were presented by three independent labels on one single advertising page in Wire Magazine: “Wurdskrieme(on Experimedia). Tongerswel”  (on Home Normal), and now Deislieper(on Hibernate).

“Deislieper”, by the way, is a Frisian name for the nightjar and literally it means ‘day sleeper’

Rooted firmly in the improv scene, core members Jan (poetry) and Romke (guitar, effects) Kleefstra never work alone.
With Piiiptsjilling, most of the contributors were Dutch fellow musicians (like Rutger ‘Machinefabriek’ Zuydervelt, Mariska Baars, Chris Bakker), but soon they also started playing with an international cast of musicians like Peter Broderick, Nils Frahm, Greg Haines (on the Seeljocht project).
Tongerswel presented their work together with saxophonist Gareth Davis, and now Deisleeper features the incredible percussion music by Sytze Pruiksma.

Piiptsjilling – Wurdskrieme

On the debut release in 2008, Piiptsjilling was the name of the album performed by Machinefabriek & Jan Kleefstra, together with Romke Kleefstra and Mariska Baars
Following this remarkable debut, the original contributors have kept working together and performing in as well as outside Holland – to growing critical acclaim.

Now, Piiptsjilling is used as the name of the band.

One might think this kind of spoken word music, spoken in the Frisian language (Friesland is a province in the north of the Netherlands) would be of local interest only.
Luckily, the opposite prove to be true: the message of their music came across widely outside Friesland too. 

The new Piiptsjilling album, called “Wurdskrieme(Cry of Words) is now released on Experimedia.net
Compared to the original Piiptsjilling album, it’s a quite different view of the same concept.

Toshimaru Nakamura – Egrets

The Samadhisound label, founded and curated by David Sylvian, simultaneously released three impressive titles. Together they present a landmark of the current experimental/electronic/ improv scene.
Be prepared: none of these albums are ‘easy listening’ music – in fact, a lot of this music wouldn’t even be considered ‘ambient’.

Next to David Sylvian, it’s Arve Henriksen linking Toshimaru Nakamura‘s album to that of Jan Bang.
However, Henriksen’s trumpet handling is quite different here: it includes the sound of the instrument itself (like the clicking of the valves), as well as the breathing of the player.
This perfectly fits the music of Toshimaru Nakamura – who is a household name in the Japanese onkyo (noise) and improv scene.